Categories
Family Law

Factors that impact a Court’s Decision in Child Custody and Child Support

In Pembroke Pines, a number of factors may impact a court’s decision in child custody and child support. A family law judge will consider a number of factors, including a child’s needs, the physical health of the child, how each parent treats the child, the age and maturity of the child, and whether or not one parent wants or needs to spend time with the child. However, in most cases a family judge will award custody based on the preference of the child’s parents.

Common reasons for modifying child support payments in Pembroke Pines include if one parent has been unable to provide the child with necessities, such as food and shelter, while the other parent has been able to provide the child with luxuries. Other reasons that child support may be modified is when the child’s needs have changed, such as if a child was born with special needs or has grown out of school. Other reasons for modifying child support payments in Pembroke Pines include changing a physical address or residence of one parent. If the non-custodying parent has been incarcerated for a prolonged period of time, the non-custodying parent may be able to receive child support payments while the custodial parent remains incarcerated. A parent who is involved in an accident that resulted in physical injury to the child, the non-custodying parent or a friend of the non-custodying parent may also be entitled to modify or stop the payments for a limited period of time.

Child support in Pembroke Pines may also be modified if one of the parents is unable to make necessary payments due to circumstances beyond the control of either parent. Some examples of these circumstances include loss of employment (being laid off or getting terminated), permanent changes in physical circumstances (such as involuntarily losing a job or becoming ill), a major change in the financial situation of one parent (such as an inheritance received by one parent and then transferred to another). In some instances, one or both parents may not be able to pay the child support due to certain medical issues, such as HIV or a certain type of cancer. Also, one or both parents may simply decide to part ways. with the relationship. When this happens, the non-custodying parent can request that a court order the payment of child support to continue.

Child support may also be modified based on the best interests of the child, although a court cannot decide what would be best for every child. There are a number of cases in which the court may determine that both parents would be better served by having one parent retains custody of the child. These situations include cases where either parent has failed to meet their duties to the child. An example of this situation is where the custodial parent does not visit the child regularly or has exhibited behavior that the court believes to be detrimental to the child. In some cases, parents may have an ongoing disagreement regarding child-care, where one parent is the primary caregiver and the other is not, where one parent is delinquent in child-care and the other has shown a willingness to seek alternative care, and where one parent has shown neglect of the child. Another situation that can be considered in determining child custody and child support would be where the non-custodying parent was involved in an accident and caused physical harm to the child.

In the case of an accident or serious incident involving the child, a court may also order that the non-custodying parent or both parents to pay child-support payments as a way of ensuring that the child receives proper medical attention. In order to be able to establish a case that one parent is unfit to care for the child, the court must prove that one of the parties is unfit and unable to properly care for the child.

Child custody and child support can be very complicated issues. They are designed to help ensure that the children are well taken care of in the event that a parent loses custody of the child. The court can make these decisions after hearing both parties’ sides of the issue, and after considering the best interests of the child.

Categories
Family Law

Settlement for Equal Distribution of Assets After Divorce

The Divorce Process is a long one and is surely not a walk in the park. There are so many things that need to be considered by each of the individuals involved in the marriage. In the end of the day it will be you who has to make the final decision on what you want out of the divorce, said divorce attorney, Ft. Lauderdale.

Whether or not your spouse wants to leave you, how about if he or she wants to get some alimony, or is unhappy with the amount of child support, your own set of circumstances might end up causing a fight with your spouse. Depending on how much time you have before the divorce becomes final, can help you determine what you can do to deal with these issues during the divorce process.

Custody Pending Divorce – When there is a separation of equal shared parenting of the children, custody pending divorce is the most common type of divorce. The child support amount is usually determined according to each parent’s financial situation. The parents negotiate the custody and visitation schedules, and any issues of joint custody are usually resolved. But, as soon as the separation occurs, the child support factor begins to take over.

Joint Custody – Joint custody is awarded to both parents to have contact with the children at all times. It can be shared parenting where one parent may only have supervised visits, or it can be exclusive or full custody. If you are able to prove that your ex has been physically or emotionally abusive, your custody case may move forward with an award of custody.

Separate Custody – For divorce purposes the courts determine a different custody placement for the children. The court decides the custody and visitation schedule for the children and how the parents interact with each other. It is not uncommon for the parents to be allowed to visit the children together.

Visitation – During the divorce process there are many more options available to the mother than the father. A child support payment is generally required during this time. The mother also has the ability to request supervised visitation.

Child Custody – Child custody can be awarded to either the mother or father during the divorce process. If there is a custody hearing for custody, the court typically bases its custody decisions on the best interest of the child.

Contested Custody – In contested custody the child is allocated between two parents who can present arguments as to why the child should remain with them. During the contested custody hearing the court tries to come to a resolution which both parents feel is fair for the child. The court can only award custody to one parent if the court finds that there is no chance for the child to make up his or her own mind.

Prose – This term refers to the representation of someone who is unrepresented. This person acts on behalf of the client and presents all the facts of the case. Pro se litigants present their own case and do not hire an attorney.

Partially Shared Parenting – In this type of parenting arrangement the parents split some time with the children between them. This is usually in the form of weekly visits and one parent is the primary caregiver.

Permanent Legal – When the legal requirements are met and the marriage is legally recognized this is known as the permanent legal divorce. Legal divorces are only granted when there is a dispute as to the equal division of assets. The assets and debt of the marriage will be considered the property of the marriage.

If you are going through the divorce process, it is important to get as much information as possible regarding the laws that apply. Remember that the more familiar you are with the laws the better off you will be. It is also wise to keep copies of all the documents that pertain to the divorce as well as the medical records and police reports.

Categories
Family Law

Family Law: Child Support, Alimony, Child Custody and More

A divorce is an emotional and sometimes violent experience for all the family members. The financial implications are often more severe than the physical aspects of a divorce. Alimony is not a legal obligation but a court order set by the court. The courts consider the income of both parties in awarding alimony to maintain the same standard of living. The best interest of the children is also considered. The amount of alimony given to the children is different for each case.

Alimony is generally not the last payment made after a divorce. Rather, it is the first payment that can be settled when a divorce has been finalized. A settlement or compromise must be reached on alimony before any division of property can be made. The time after a divorce has been finalized to reach a compromise can be longer if it is necessary to consider a child’s custody and support issues.

In some cases temporary alimony may be granted while the divorce is being finalized. Temporary alimony allows one party to find employment and resume earning wages. Temporary alimony is an allowance for a short period of time. This can be granted until either the marriage is over or the divorce is final.

Permanent alimony is often awarded after a divorce is finalized. It is a fixed amount paid indefinitely. In most cases, permanent alimony is a greater obligation than temporary alimony. Visit www.pittsburghdivorcelawyers.org for more information.

Once a divorce has been finalized, alimony ceases. The divorce decree can state that the alimony is ended. There may be other court orders that are set in place such as an order of child support or permanent guardianship.

When a divorce is finalized, the financial implications are usually greater than those of a divorce when it is ongoing. It is important to take the time to seek out counseling from a professional to help you understand the factors involved in divorce, said the best family lawyers in PA.

The most common type of family law is Divorce settlement. This is a combination of custody, child support, and alimony. When a couple divorces, the lawyer helps the couple to make a plan that will help them spend their time living together and get back on their feet again. This can be done through the divorce settlement or via child support and alimony.

The lawyer’s main job is to ensure that the couple is able to handle the divorce, that both partners will come to an amicable agreement, and that both will get along and have an equal say in making their own decisions. He or she can make sure that there are enough money and property for both parties to split between the divorce payment, the child support payments, and the alimony payments. If you want to get more relevant and important details about child support and alimony click here.